Home C-Section Births Alex's Birth Story By Mrs. Rawson
Alex's Birth Story By Mrs. Rawson PDF Print E-mail
Birth Stories - C-Section Birth Stories
Friday, 14 November 2008 14:53
14 months ago, my father died, and that month my cycle was so shaken up I fell pregnant at a totally unexpected time. It was a huge shock: I was 41, and looking forward to some easing of pressure after struggling to set up a successful home business and look after 2 small children. The pregnancy started off stressfully: I was very sick, and had 5 weeks of bleeding. At one stage, the doctor was so sure I was loosing the baby, he gave me all the details for arranging a D & C! I worked hard not to worry: my first daughter died when she was born from a health problem that developed in the last couple weeks of preganacy; my first son was an emergency caesarean; and my other daughter was an elective caesarean at 37 weeks after the placenta started to fail.

But all in all, this pregnancy wasn't difficult: a bit more bleeding at 27 weeks, and all the usual side effects of lots of throwing up, etc. We decided against Amneocentosis: our philosophy after losing our first child has always been that every life has its own destiny and purpose, and we could not choose to abort a baby just because a fallible test indicated there could be some degree of some problem. But as the birth date grew near, I became convinced the baby would prbably have some major health problem. (I never discussed this with anyone though:what would be the point?)

This time, I agreed with my doctor to an elective caesarean at 39 weeks at 7.30 am. I went to hospital the night before and checked in: I did this with the previous birth and found it very relaxing. I had a private room, so I "built my next" with family photos, flowers, etc. My children (now 8 and 5) kissed me goodbye nervously, and were only calmed with a big "bribe" of lollies from my husband. I met my anaesthetist and a couple other members of my "team": quite a jolly lot, very efficient but friendly. And I was shaved: yuck.

The next morning I was woken early and taken over to theatre where my husband met me: in good time! The last elective I had was scary, because a woman in the theatre was screaming and John was late. I was convinced to have a spinal block rather than epidural this time. I had to curl up into the tightest ball around my huge belly, and this time it hurt; but when it was in, it quickly worked. A strange sensation, losing all feeling and watching yourself be moved around. My husband and I continued to joke and laugh, and before I knew it, we were in the theatre. I was nervous: I remembered the first time I was in theatre with our first little girl, and staring at my husband's glazed hazel eyes as we listened to the team trying to resusitate our little girl. And I found myself remembering with tenderness what it felt like to hold her warm but still little body. So to change my thoughts I joined in more with the general conversation about politics, weather, etc until, all of a sudden, my doctor said "Well, were you expecting a boy or a girl?" and I looked up in amazement to see my new little son lifted up out of my womb.

I'd actually forgotten why I was lying there! I immediately fell in love with the tiny squirming little bundle when they placed him across my chest to hold for a minute before whisking him into the next room for a quick check-up. My husband was estatic. The whole team was laughing and joking and congratulating us.

Alex is now 5 months old, adored by all of us. I am so grateful for modern technology: in those odd moments when I think ruefully of not ever having had a "natural birth" I remember that Mother Nature is often cruel: if not for today's hospitals, I would surely have died with my first daughter. Instead, we have a wonderful family. But that was definitely our last baby: we made sure of that by having my tubes tied at the same time as the caesarean!
 
 

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